Book Review: Brotherhood of the Wheel

So, I just finished reading this very interesting horror novel by R. S. Blecher: The Brotherhood of the Wheel.

What’s it about? Well, way back in the olden days, the Knights Templar Order took it upon themselves to protect the peoples traveling the road to Jerusalem. Since than the order has changed and now protects the roads of the modern world from monsters, both human and supernatural.

Jimmie Aussapile

The story follows Jimmie Aussapile, a member of the Brethren (current name of the knights) as he takes down organizations of serial killers using the highways as hunting grounds and beasts feeding on the innocent. Jimmie is an awesome representation of the ‘every-man’. He’s a truck driver with a wife, kids, and a mortgage.

Supporting Actors

Other characters in the book were impressive as well; such as Heck, the motorcycle club member recently returned from serving in the middle east, and Lovina, the police officer with the tortured past. Though, none of the other characters seem quite as fleshed out as Jimmie. I’m probably a bit spoiled on reading too much Stephen King lately, but I would have loved reading more back story on the other characters.

There is one group of characters, I’ll call them the Ava Bunch, that could have been given more back story. The way they are included they are more plot points than people. I would have reveled in any extra time spent in this story world.

One character I would love to had more back story and more ‘screen time’, is Max. She is a member of another branch of the ancient Templar Order, the Builders. They collect information, unlike the Brethren who act as the muscle doing the actual footwork and dying. She sort of reminds me of Abby from NCIS.

Luckily, there are possibilities left open for further explorations of Max and the intricacies between the different factions.

All of the Song References!

One thing that could have been toned down were the constant song references. It seemed like every scene had [random hit from the 70s] playing on the car stereo or on the bar’s jukebox. It was distracting at times.

Conclusion

This story is an intense thrill ride smushed with Supernatural and that odd M. Night Shyamalan movie, Lady in the Water. Like these things this book is an amalgam of folklore and urban legends. Belcher has pulled many disparate creepy things into a believable narrative. Here are some items that come up: shadow people, black-eyed kids, truck stops, black dogs, the wild hunt, the zodiak killer, lay lines, the Illuminati, greasy diners, etc.

Some of the violence is a little graphic, so, I wouldn’t recommend this to younger readers. But, for the mature audience, this is a fun read. Highly recommended book.

I give it 4 of 5 semi trucks:

I look forward to devouring the next book when it comes out and falling further into this fictional universe.

Until next time,
The Wheel Turns

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